Oracle Virtual Desktop Infrastructure and Unified Directory

Oracle Virtual Desktop Infrastructure offers a complete solution for managing and providing access to virtualized desktop environments hosted in the datacenter.  Oracle Virtual Desktop Instrastructure enables organizations to simplify administration, reduce operating costs, increase the utilization of existing IT assets, and boost security by moving from a tradtional desktop environment to a virtual desktop architecture.

Typically, you configure Oracle VDI to use the information held in a corporate user directory, like Oracle Unified Directory Server.

You can use the OUD setup or the ODSM to create a suffix holding users, eg,  ou=People,dc=oscr,dc=uk,dc=oracle,dc=com using existing schema.
Then create a few user entries with the fields User Name, First Name, Last Name, User ID and User Password.  So for my account it is

User Name : Sylvain Duloutre
First Name : Sylvain
Last Name : Duloutre
User ID : sduloutr
User Password : ****

To install Virtual Desktop Infrastructure, follow the install guide, then connect to the VDI Web UI using your preferred browser. Here is a screenshot showing the setup of the VDI server :

vdi01.png[1]

Next are 2 screenshots showing the LDAP settings and how they map to VDI:

vdi02.png[1]vdi03.png[1]

As you can see there isn’t actually a lot of configuration to do.  You  can now login to VDI from a Sunray or from the Oracle Virtual Desktop Client using the login name and password stored in OUD.

Thanks to Rob for VDI snapshots and testing.

Using execution context ID (ECID)

Execution context ID (ECID) is a unique identifier to correlate events or requests associated with the same transation across several components.

The ECID value for a particular request is generated at the first layer and is passed down to the subsequent layers. The ECID value is logged (and auditable) in each product involved in the transaction. ECID allows an administrator to track the end-to-end flow of a particular request across the product stack.

ECID are supported by OUD and can be used to track LDAP requests from the client down to the ultimate LDAP server processing the request (inclusing LDAP access layer/proxy if any).

When performing a LDAP operation, a client can pass a ECID using the LDAP control extension 2.16.840.1.113894.1.8.31 . This ECID is logged by OUD. The OUD server generates a ECID in case none is present in the incoming request.

ECID are logged in the “Oracle Access Logger”. By default, this logger is disabled. To enable it, run the command below:

dsconfig set-log-publisher-prop \
         –publisher-name Oracle\ Access\ Logger \
         –set enabled:true\
–hostname localhost\
–port <admin port>\
–bindDN cn=Directory\ Manager \
–bindPassword ****** \
–no-prompt

Here is a sniplet of the Oracle access log:

[2012-08-16T16:10:26.770+02:00] [OUD] [TRACE] [OUD-24641559] [PROTOCOL] [host: prehnite] [nwaddr: 10.166.70.62] [tid: 25] [userId: sduloutr] [ecid: 10.166.70.62:37126:1345126226770:39,0] [category: REQ] [conn: -1] [op: 80] [msgID: 81] [dn: o=example] [type: synchronization] MODIFY

The administrator can then search the logs using a particular ECID value. Audit logs can be queried for a given ECID through Oracle BI Publisher’s audit reports. For example, if you send an LDAP request to Oracle Virtual Directory front-ending Oracle Unified Directory, an ECID associated with the LDAP request is present in the OVD diagnostic logs and audit logs; similarly, when the query reaches OUD, OUD includes the same ECID in its diagnostic logs and audit reports.